Spiritual, living cathedral

Ringing in the new: a new set of bells for Notre-Dame’s towers

History of the bells of Notre-Dame

Amongst the oldest musical instruments, bells have been associated with Christianity since its earliest days, “proclaiming God on the horizon”, as Charles Péguy, the French nineteenth century poet, once wrote.
Church bells have not merely marked the passage of time since the Middle Ages: their primary purpose is and remains liturgical. Through their peals and chimes, they bid us to come together and call us to prayer. Their sounds tell of the joys and sorrows of the Christian community and, in a special way at Notre-Dame, they tell of the major moments that have marked the history of France.

The ringing of bells before services is attested from the end of the 12th Century, long before the Cathedral’s construction had come to a close. These bells increased in number over the centuries, as the Cathedral’s life evolved and its influence developed. Each of the bells was recast once or even several times each century, within the immediate vicinity of the Cathedral [1].
By 1769 the Cathedral boasted:
- 8 bells in the North Tower.
- 2 great bells (bourdons), named Marie [2] and Emmanuel, [3] in the South Tower.
- 7 bells in the Spire.
- 3 clock bells in the North Transept.
These 20 bells rang out over the city, constituting a Parisian soundscape which lasted until the end of the 18th Century.

The ravages of the French Revolution did not spare the Cathedral’s bells. They were uninstalled, broken and melted down between 1791 and 1792. Only the great bell, Emmanuel, the centrepiece of the collection, was to be spared and reinstalled in the South Tower in 1802, on the orders of Napoleon I.

In 1856, 4 bells were installed in the North Tower. In 1867, 3 bells were installed in the Spire and 3 bells in the roof of the transept. All six of these bells were linked to the monumental clock installed in the Cathedral’s wooden roof structure, above the vaults.

 

The new bells

If to this day Emmanuel, the great bell, remains one of the finest examples of its kind in Europe (as campanologists, musicians and musicologists generally agree), the same could not be said of the four bells housed in the North Tower since 1856. The bells were flawed by the poor quality of the metal used in their production (metal both musically mediocre and given to wear), as well as by their number, size and acoustic properties – out of tune with each other and with the great bell.

In the 21st Century, both musical concerns and the liturgical role of the bells (to ring services and the hours with a melody appropriate to the liturgical season) have determined the selection of the new set of bells. Drawing on an historical parallel – for the history of the Cathedral’s bells is well documented – the project seeks to re-establish the arrangement of the bells prior to their destruction. That is: 8 bells in the North Tower and 2 great bells in the South Tower, designed around the existing great bell, Emmanuel.
The project has been fully approved by the Commission Supérieure des Monuments Historiques. Moreover, the installation of a second great bell in the South Tower will help protect Emmanuel. Over 330 years old, this bell must now be rung prudently in order to preserve it for posterity. Indeed, the presence of a second bell had already been anticipated in the original plans of the 19th Century architect Viollet-le-Duc when the belfry was reconstructed in 1845.

This modern-day intervention thus stays in tune with the history of the Cathedral’s construction, as do the other projects of the 850th Jubilee Year, and will moreover bring to contemporary ears in the Cathedral’s vicinity the soundscape of late 18th Century Paris.

After invitation to tender :
- the 8 bells of the North Tower will be cast by the CORNILLE-HAVARD Bell Foundry in Villedieu-les-Poêles (département de la Manche, France).
- - the great bell, Marie, will be cast by the ROYAL EIJSBOUTS Bell Foundry in Asten (Netherlands).

Making a bell requires an extremely precise procedure in order to attain the desired musical characteristics. The decorations are inscribed in relief on a mold into which molten metal is later poured. The mold is later removed, leaving behind the shape of the bell.

The names given to the bells recall saints and other important figures in the life of the diocese of Paris and of the Church.
In the South Tower :
- Marie (Mary), in honour of the Virgin Mary and in memory of the first great bell of the Cathedral, which was cast in 1378.
In the North Tower (from the biggest to the smallest bell) :
- Gabriel, in honour of Saint Gabriel, who announced the birth of Jesus to the Virgin Mary. In the 15th Century, the largest of the North Tower’s bells already bore the name Gabriel.
- Anne-Geneviève ; in honour of Saint Anne, the mother of the Virgin Mary and in honour of Saint Geneviève, the patron saint of Paris.
- Denis, in honour of Saint Denis, the first bishop of Paris, c. 250 AD. He is the patron saint of the diocese.
- Marcel, in honour of Saint Marcel, the ninth bishop of Paris, at the end of the 4th Century.
- Étienne (Stephen), in honour of Saint Steven, the very first Christian martyr. The church constructed (from 690 AD onwards) on the same site as the current Cathedral bore the name Étienne.
- Benoît-Joseph (Benedict-Joseph), in honour of Pope Benedict XVI. Joseph Ratzinger was made pope in 2005.
- Maurice, in memory of Maurice de Sully, the 72nd bishop of Paris, from 1160-1196, who launched the construction of the current cathedral in 1163.
- Jean-Marie, in memory of Cardinal Jean-Marie Lustiger, the 139th archbishop of Paris, from 1981 to 2005.

The ceremonies of the blessing of the bells, presided by Cardinal André VINGT-TROIS, the archbishop of Paris, will take place on Saturday the 2nd February, feast day of the Presentation to the Temple. On this day, the Children’s Jubilee Year Celebrations will gather together in the Cathedral several thousand children from the diocese of Paris.
The bells will be on display in the nave until the end of February, allowing visitors to admire and accept this part of our shared heritage, before the bells are installed in the Towers. They will be rung for the first time on Palm Sunday, which begins Holy Week, on the 23rd March 2013.

 

Click here to hear a reconstruction of how the bells would have sounded at the end of the 18th Century,
and as they will sound once again in 2013, click here
.

 

This project is directed by Notre-Dame Cathedral and made possible by the Association Notre-Dame de Paris 2013.. It involved :
- a historical and musical study of the Cathedral’s bells and a proposal for their modern-day restitution carried out by Monsieur Régis SINGER, a campanologist and a specialist consultant on matters related to the heritage of bell-ringing for the Ministère de la Culture et de la Communication ;
- - A technical study of the Cathedral’s belfries, their history and their adaption for the installation of the new bells, carried out by Benjamin MOUTON, architect in chief of the Monuments Historiques ;
- An invitation to tender was created by the committee organised by the rector of the Cathedral.

Committee members :
- Monseigneur Patrick JACQUIN, rector and chief priest of Notre-Dame Cathedral and president of the Association Notre-Dame de Paris 2013,
- Monsieur Philippe LEFEBVRE, director of operations and organist of Notre-Dame Cathedral,
- Monsieur Jean-François LEMERCIER, general secretary of the Association Notre-Dame de Paris 2013,
- Madame Bénédicte ESNAULT, director of operations for the Association Notre-Dame de Paris 2013,
- Monsieur Benoît FERRÉ, Compagnie Européenne d’Architecture EUROGIP, architect,
- Monsieur Régis SINGER, campanologist and specialist consultant on matters related to the heritage of bell-ringing for the Ministère de la Culture et de la Communication,
- Monsieur Laurent PRADES, technical manager of Notre-Dame Cathedral.

The committee chose the following bell founders :
- CORNILLE-HAVARD (Villedieu-les-Poêles, France), to cast the 8 bells for the North Tower,
- ROYAL EIJSBOUTS (Asten, Pays-Bays) to cast the great bell for the South Tower.

Become a part of this exceptional project!

You too can support this project and follow in the footsteps of the cathedral’s builders. For more information click here.

 

JPEG - 244.3 kb
Making the core (inside mold of the bells)

 

JPEG - 102.3 kb
Making the core (inside mold of the bells)

 

JPEG - 242.2 kb
Making the core (inside mold of the bells)

 

JPEG - 227.5 kb
Making the core (inside mold of the bells)

 

JPEG - 239.5 kb
Core of the bell Gabriel

 

JPEG - 101.6 kb
Drying out the core (inside mold of the bells) by way of a charcoal fire on the inside

 

JPEG - 75.5 kb
The artist working on the decorations

 

JPEG - 109.8 kb
Le bourdon "Marie". Sol#2 ; 6023 kg ; 206,5 cm de diamètre.

En l’honneur de la bienheureuse VIERGE MARIE, Mère de Dieu et Mère de l’Eglise, et tout particulièrement protectrice de cette église-cathédrale Notre-Dame, église-mère de l’archidiocèse de Paris. En souvenir également du premier bourdon « MARIE » qui, de 1378 à 1792, fit entendre sa sonnerie. Réalisé grâce au mécénat de la Fondation Bettencourt Schueller.
Sur le bourdon : texte du "Je vous salue Marie" ; texte séculier ; médaillon de la Vierge à l’Enfant couronnée d’étoiles ; frise de l’Adoration des Mages et des Noces de Cana; Croix de gloire ; "Via viatores quaerit".
Photo : Cailloux et Cie

 

JPEG - 133.4 kb
La cloche "Gabriel". La#2 ; 4162 kg ; 182,8 cm de diamètre.

L’Ange GABRIEL apporta au genre humain l’annonce tant attendue de la venue du Sauveur et c’est lui qui salua la Vierge Marie comme pleine de grâce. Réalisée grâce au mécénat de la Fondation Sisley.
Sur cette cloche : première phrase de l’Angélus, "L’Ange du Seigneur apporta l’annonce à Marie" ; 40 filets symbolisant les 40 jours passés au désert par le Christ et les 40 années d’errance de Moïse dans le Sinaï ; sur la couronne, motifs de lys et Vierge à l’Enfant couronnée d’étoiles ; sur la cloche, martèlement épuré ; Croix de gloire ; "Via viatores quaerit" ; texte séculier et profil de Notre-Dame au coeur de Paris.
Photo : Cailloux et Cie

 

JPEG - 128.6 kb
La cloche "Anne Geneviève". Si2 ; 3477 kg ; 172,5 cm de diamètre.

En mémoire de SAINTE ANNE, la mère de la bienheureuse Vierge Marie de qui devait naître le Fils unique de Dieu et de SAINTE GENEVIEVE, patronne et protectrice de Paris.
Sur cette cloche : deuxième phrase de l’Angélus, « Et elle conçut du Saint Esprit » ; 3 filets symbolisant la Trinité ; motifs de flammes et feu évoquant la ténacité de sainte Geneviève ; Croix de gloire ; « Via viatores quaerit » ; texte séculier et profil de Notre-Dame au coeur de Paris ; sur la couronne, motifs de feu et Vierge à l’Enfant couronnée d’étoiles ; texte séculier et profil de Notre-Dame au coeur de Paris. Photo : Cailloux et Cie

 

JPEG - 124.3 kb
La cloche "Denis". Do#3 ; 2502 kg ; 153,6 cm de diamètre.

En mémoire de SAINT DENIS, premier évêque de Paris, qui fut envoyé par l’évêque de Rome avec ses compagnons, le prêtre saint Rustique et le diacre saint Éleuthère, pour semer l’Évangile du salut et souffrir le martyre en témoignage de Celui qui donne la vie aux morts.
Sur cette cloche : troisième phrase de l’Angélus, « Voici la servante du Seigneur » ; 7 filets symbolisant les 7 dons de l’Esprit Saint et des 7 sacrements de l’Eglise ; motifs de «griffures» symbolisant le martyre ; « Via viatores quaerit » ; couronne aux motifs de "griffures" et Vierge à l’Enfant couronnée d’étoiles ; texte séculier et profil de Notre-Dame au coeur de Paris.
Photo : Cailloux et Cie

 

JPEG - 130.7 kb
La cloche "Marcel". Ré#3 ; 1925 kg ; 139,3 cm de diamètre.

En mémoire de SAINT MARCEL, 9e évêque de Paris au Vème siècle, qui fut particulièrement vénéré par les Parisiens pour sa charité envers les pauvres et les malades.
Sur cette cloche : quatrième phrase de l’Angélus, « Qu’il me soit fait selon ta parole » ; 5 filets symbolisant 3 personnes et 2 natures formant 1 seul Dieu ; motifs d’eau, allusion à la Bièvre ; Croix de gloire ; « Via viatores quaerit » ; couronne aux motifs d’eau et Vierge à l’Enfant couronnée d’étoiles ; texte séculier et profil de Notre-Dame au coeur de Paris.
Photo : Cailloux et Cie

 

JPEG - 125.2 kb
La cloche "Étienne". Mi#3 ; 1494 kg ; 126,7 cm de diamètre.

En souvenir de l’antique église-cathédrale de Paris qui a précédé l’actuelle cathédrale Notre-Dame et qui fut placée sous la protection de SAINT ÉTIENNE, premier martyr.
Sur cette cloche : Cinquième phrase de l’Angélus, « Et le Verbe s’est fait chair » ; 1 filet en référence à la phrase de l’Angélus citée précédemment, ils ne forment plus qu’un ; motifs de cailloux évoquant le martyre de saint Étienne ; Croix de gloire ; « Via viatores quaerit » ; couronne aux motifs de cailloux et Vierge à l’Enfant couronnée d’étoiles ; texte séculier et profil de Notre-Dame au coeur de Paris. Photo : Cailloux et Cie

 

JPEG - 140.2 kb
La cloche "Benoît-Joseph". Fa#3 ; 1309 kg ; 120,7 cm de diamètre.

Pour conserver, en 2013 année de la Foi célébrée par l’Église universelle, le souvenir du Jubilé du 850ème anniversaire de la cathédrale Notre-Dame de Paris ouvert sous le pontificat de Sa Sainteté le Pape BENOÎT XVI, notre Saint-Père.
Sur cette cloche : sixième phrase de l’Angélus, « Et il a habité parmi nous » ; 12 filets symbolisant les 12 apôtres ; motifs de clefs évoquant saint Pierre ; Croix de gloire ; « Via viatores quaerit » ; couronne aux armes de Benoît XVI et Vierge à l’Enfant couronnée d’étoiles ; texte séculier et profil de Notre-Dame au coeur de Paris. Photo : Cailloux et Cie

 

JPEG - 133.9 kb
La cloche "Maurice". Sol#3 ; 1011 kg ; 109,7 cm de diamètre.

En mémoire MAURICE de SULLY, 72e évêque de Paris, qui posa la première pierre de cette cathédrale Notre-Dame en 1163.
Sur cette cloche : septième phrase de l’Angélus, « Priez pour nous, sainte Mère de Dieu » ; 8 filets symbolisant la plénitude (7+1) ; motifs inspirés de fils de chanvre, d’éléments architecturaux et du plan de la cathédrale, évocation des bâtisseurs de Notre-Dame ; Croix de gloire ; « Via viatores quaerit » ; couronne aux motifs de fils de chanvre et Vierge à l’Enfant couronnée d’étoiles ; texte séculier et profil de Notre-Dame au coeur de Paris. Photo : Cailloux et Cie

 

JPEG - 136.5 kb
La cloche "Jean-Marie". La#3 ; 782 kg ; 99,7 cm de diamètre.

En hommage au cardinal JEAN-MARIE LUSTIGER, 139e évêque de Paris de 1981 à 2005.
Sur cette cloche : huitième phrase de l’Angélus, « Afin que nous soyons rendus dignes des promesses du Christ » ; 9 filets symbolisant les 9 hiérarchies célestes ; sur la cloche, initiales des 4 évangélistes, chacune sur un motif correspondant à l’allégorie du Tétramorphe ; Croix de gloire ; « Via viatores quaerit » ; sur la couronne, motifs de livres avec les initiales des 4 grands prophètes ; texte séculier et profil de Notre-Dame au coeur de Paris. Photo : Cailloux et Cie

 

[1around the base of the towers, in the Saint-Jean-le-Rond cemetery to the north, in the courtyard of the episcopal palace to the south, or, on the many occasions when several bells were being cast at the same time, on the land at the eastern point of the island.

[2Cast in 1378, 1396, 1402, 1430, 1451 and 1472

[3Originally named Jacqueline, the bell was recast several times during the 14th Century, in 1430, 1451 and 1480. In 1680, the bell was recast: this time its weight was increased, and it was renamed Emmanuel; the bell was recast a second time in 1680 and then again in 1685-1686.

Diocèse de Paris Notre-Dame de Paris 2013 Facebook Google Twitter Flickr Youtube Foursquare RSS
Français
English
Calendar
Hours
Visits
Contacts
Newsletter
Make a donation
Credits